Kaela Newman, Physiotherapist

Kaela is a passionate physiotherapist who is dedicated to providing comprehensive and individualized care to her patients. She completed her Bachelor of Science with specialization in Human Kinetics at the University of Ottawa and her Master of Physical Therapy at the University of Toronto. While at the University of Toronto, she served as President of the Physical Therapy Graduate Student Association and co-founded the Community Philanthropic Committee. She has been awarded the Canadian Physiotherapy Association Leadership Award of Excellence, the Department of Physical Therapy Mountain Challenge Book Prize and the Gordon Cressy Leadership Award from the University of Toronto. She continues to be actively involved in the University of Toronto‚Äôs Physical Therapy program by assisting with labs and examinations. 

Kaela focuses clinically on both orthopedic and neurological conditions, including stroke, brain injury, and neurological movement disorders. She believes in empowering her clients and working collaboratively to develop individualized and meaningful treatment plans. She is a believer of life-long learning and continues to improve her clinical knowledge and skills with continuing education courses. She has a particular interest in treating ankle, knee, hip and shoulder injuries. She has completed courses in advanced manual therapy, acupuncture, McKenzie method, Bobath, and Neuro-Development Treatment (NDT).

Kaela grew up in Elora, Ontario with three brothers and played high level hockey and lacrosse. She continues to live an active lifestyle through running, weight training, hiking, hockey and kayaking. She stays connected with the sports community through volunteer work as a hockey coach and sports first responder. Among other events, she has provided medical coverage for the Muskoka Ironman, the Ontario Winter Games and the Canadian Sledge Hockey Championships.

Kaela combines her positivity, experience and passion to help her patients reach their goals, no matter how big or how small.